Does cardio kill gains? There’s a lot of debate when it comes to cardio and whether or not it does more harm than good when it comes to building muscle. Some people swear by cardio as a necessary part of their routine, while others believe that it does nothing but waste time and energy. So, what’s the truth? Does cardio kill your gains?

Does Cardio Make Me Lose Muscle?

Everyone has asked himself at some point in their muscle building journey ”does cardio kill gains” The answer to this question is a bit more complicated than a simple yes or no. Cardio does have the potential to sabotage your gains if it’s not done correctly, but it can also be a helpful tool in your muscle-building arsenal. It all comes down to how you approach your cardio workouts and what type of cardio you’re doing.

If you’re someone who likes to go hard at everything they do, then chances are you’re not giving your body the rest it needs to recover from your workouts. This can lead to overtraining, which can result in decreased performance and increased risk of injury.

When you’re overtraining, your body is in a constant state of stress, which can lead to elevated cortisol levels. Cortisol is a hormone that breaks down muscle tissue, so if you’re constantly overtraining, you’re putting yourself at risk of losing muscle mass.

On the other hand, if you approach your cardio workouts with a little bit more moderation, then they can actually be beneficial for building muscle. Cardio can help improve your cardiovascular fitness, which will in turn improve your overall endurance. This can be helpful when you’re trying to build muscle because it will allow you to push yourself harder during your weightlifting workouts. In addition, cardio can help improve your recovery time, which means you’ll be able to come back stronger and more rested for your next workout.

So, does cardio kill your gains? It really depends on how you approach it. If you’re overtraining, then yes, cardio can be detrimental to your muscle-building efforts. However, if you take a more moderate approach and use cardio as a tool to improve your overall fitness, then it can actually be helpful in your quest to build more muscle.

does cardio kill gains
does cardio kill gains?

Bro Science Vs. Cardio

When it comes to fitness, there’s a lot of “bro science” floating around. This is the type of advice that you’ll hear from your well-meaning but misinformed friends at the gym. A lot of this advice is based on anecdotal evidence and personal experience, rather than actual scientific research.

One example of this is the idea that cardio kills your gains. This is a common piece of bro science that you’ll hear people spouting off at the gym. The thinking goes like this: when you do cardio, your body starts breaking down muscle for energy. Therefore, if you want to build muscle, you should avoid doing any type of cardio whatsoever. This line of thinking is flawed for a few reasons.

First of all, your body does not start breaking down muscle tissue for energy when you do cardio. Yes, during intense exercise, your body will break down muscle tissue for energy, but this happens regardless of whether or not you’re doing cardio.

When you lift weights, your body is also breaking down muscles for energy. The difference is that, when you lift weights, your body is also simultaneously building up muscle. So, while it’s true that your body does break down muscle during exercise, this doesn’t mean that cardio is bad for building muscle. In fact, as we mentioned earlier, cardio can actually be helpful for building muscle.

Another problem with the “cardio kills your gains” bro science is that it doesn’t take into account the different types of cardio. Not all forms of cardio are created equal. Some forms of cardio, like HIIT (high-intensity interval training), are actually quite beneficial for building muscle. HIIT cardio is a type of cardio where you alternate between short bursts of all-out effort and active recovery. This type of cardio is very effective for building muscle because it helps improve your overall cardiovascular fitness while also helping you to recover faster from your weightlifting workouts.

Research Shows

the most common mistake is doing cardio at the wrong time.

For most people, the best time to do cardio is when they are already in the gym for a weight-lifting workout. if you decide to do cardio at the same time as your weight lifting workout make sure to do it after your weight lifting session, then be sure to do your cardio after your weights workout, rather than before.

in 2016 a study that a few people participated in showed that their weight lifting workout performance decreased because of a 20-minute cardio session they did before.

the participants were tested on 5 exercises:

  • High pull
  • Squat
  • Bench press
  • Deadlift
  • Push press

they did the exercises for 3 sets of 6-10 reps at 70-80% of their one-rep max. the cardio that the participants did before the weight lifting workout resulted in (9.1-18.16%) less performance.

Should I do Cardio on a Rest Day?

This really depends on your goals. If your goal is to build muscle, then you should focus on lifting weights and give your body a day of rest to recover. However, if your goal is to improve your overall fitness or lose weight, then doing some cardio on a rest day can be beneficial.

Bottom line: does cardio kill your gains? No, not if you approach it in the right way. Cardio can actually be helpful for building muscle, as long as you don’t overdo it and you choose the right type of cardio. So next time you’re at the gym, don’t be afraid to add some HIIT cardio into your routine! Your muscles will thank you for it later.

Low-Intensity Cardio Routine

If you are going to do cardio on a day you are not lifting weights, then a low-intensity routine is best. This could be something like walking, jogging, or biking at a moderate pace for 30-60 minutes. Doing this type of cardio will help you improve your overall fitness without putting too much stress on your body.

Remember: when it comes to building muscle, focus on lifting weights and giving your body the rest it needs. Adding some cardio into the mix can be helpful, but don’t let it take away from your weightlifting workouts!

High-Intensity Cardio Workout

High-intensity interval training, or HIIT, is a type of cardio where you alternate between short bursts of all-out effort and active recovery. This type of cardio is very effective for building muscle because it helps improve your overall cardiovascular fitness while also helping you to recover faster from your weightlifting workouts.

A typical HIIT workout might involve sprinting for 30 seconds followed by 90 seconds of walking or jogging. You would then repeat this cycle several times. HIIT workouts are typically shorter than traditional cardio workouts, but they are much more intense.

One study showed that just eight weeks of HIIT training was enough to improve both VO₂max (a measure of cardiovascular fitness) and muscular endurance in participants.

So if you’re looking for a type of cardio that will help you build muscle, HIIT is the way to go! Just make sure not to do it too close to your weightlifting workouts, as it can interfere with your recovery.

Conclusion

you need to build your endurance, then you can lift longer and harder without getting tired. And live a healthy lifestyle. What’s the point of being huge if you can’t use your body to the max?

Look at Dwayne Johnson’s workout program. He runs at least 45 minutes a day and look he is huge. Cardio is part of any good exercise routine, it’s just that the amount of cardio should be adjusted to your goal. I run for 45 min 3x a week (my goal is to build more muscle while still being fit) and lift 4 days a week. and I don’t see any difference in my muscle growth from before I did this type of cardio in my routine.

So if you only want to build muscle DO cardio AFTER your weight lift session. so it doesn’t hinder your performance. you can do HIIT or low-intensity cardio. Just do it in moderation.

if you go for the overall picture you should do some intense cardio, after all, your heart is a muscle too.

So does cardio kill gains too much YES. in moderation NO, it’s even beneficial. I hope that this article helped you.